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Today, discussing porn and even using it, may not be as taboo as it once was, but it is hardly something you’d bring up to the Comcast guy (or girl) installing your new cable system.  Or, maybe it is.  For citizens in Britain, it appears that this will become a regular conversation for Internet company employees and their many customers.  Awkward, right? In fact, if you have any intention of even thinking about maybe, possibly having access, in order to have the option, to consider taking a peak of something that could be seen as pornography, you are going to have to have that conversation.

Would you like Internet access? Yes, please.  Cable?  Duh! Land line? Nah, I’m good.  Pornography? Well….

Like I said, awkward.

Many cable carriers currently offer family friendly blocking packages that block certain content and categories of shows and websites that could be seen as more racy and inappropriate. This is especially the case for households with children.  Soon in Britain, these “family-friendly filters” will be installed automatically with Internet service, and citizens will have to actively “declare” that they would like access to legal online pornography.

Like I said, awkward.

So what has brought on this change in policy across the pond? Currently the status of pornography is very similar to the US, including the illegality of child pornography.  It is difficult to dispute the fact that television shows, Internet sites, music, and other media have become a bit more racy than when our parents were growing up.  Think Miley Cyrus at the VMAs (Miley Cyrus anywhere), or HBO’s “True Blood” where full frontal nudity of a vampire is actually “a thing”.  But what British officials are really worried about are situations of violent pornographic content that often draws in criminals and offenders themselves.

Britain officials hope to bring about further legislation to monitor Internet security matters including those of pornographic nature, as well as cyber bullying.  In the upcoming month Google, Facebook and Twitter executives will be asked to a parliamentary hearing in London.   This could involve possible legislation involving limiting searches of illegal images.  Prime Minister Cameron has publicly spoken out to the major internet providers.  “I have a very clear message for Google, Bing, Yahoo and the rest, “ Cameron said. “You have a duty to act on this – and it is a moral duty. If there are technical obstacles to acting on [search engines], don’t just stand by and say nothing can be done; use your great brains to help overcome them.” The Prime Minister has been very adamant  about these new efforts and this plan to clean up the British people’s online visits.

While there are certainly critics of these new approaches, it appears that with this action, the intention of the government is not to completely take away all porn access.   The current legally accessible sources will not be taken away.  Instead it intends to ensure the opportunity to protect all Internet using families from certain exposures.  After all, you can always get that access back, if only to have the option of thinking about maybe, possibly considering, taking a peak of something that could maybe be considered pornography.  It’ll just cost you one awkward conversation with your Internet provider.

What do you think, is this a good idea?  Is this kind of change important to protect our youth?  Should we be censoring our television programs more as well? Do you think more censorship is to come?

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